post wp-admin edit 16811

My Taste Buds Miss Home

Since I started living away from my parents, I’ve taken to cooking many variations of curry, because it reminds me of home and the ingredients are readily available – the paste is easily found in jars, bricks that resemble chocolate bars, powder mixes, and even ready-made packets that only require heated water (which if I’m using, is pretty much an indication that I’ve thrown in the towel, because I’m feeling too lazy to cook).

I make Thai green curry, Nonya red curry, mild Japanese curry, and Indian butter curry. It’s easy to throw together quickly – just add chopped onions, milk, potatoes, chicken or tofu, some frozen mixed vegetables. A few good stirs and you’re done. I spoon it over steamed jasmine rice, which serves as a satisfying enough meal, doing its part to stave off hunger and homesickness.

It’s not the same, of course, as my grandmother’s chicken curry. It never has the same consistency, or the same richness the fresh coconut milk that she uses provides. It never contains the pieces of tau kwa (deep fried firm tofu), because I can’t seem to find them in the supermarket, and is always missing the right shade of fiery red hints to a level of spice, just enough to make me reach for a glass of water. Is it because I lack the years of experience she’s had at a stove, expertly whipping up an array of dishes to feed an army of relatives? Am I missing out on key ingredients, lost to me because I no longer live in Singapore? Or does food really just taste better when you have people you love to share it with?

On particularly cold winter evenings in Boston, I dream of clattering noisily in my flip-flops to the food court behind my house, back home in Singapore. Food can be paid for with a few dollars and change. If you get take out, it comes in a clamshell Styrofoam box, or wrapped in a piece of brown wax-lined paper with a rubber band wound around it. It’s a little messy, and would leave oily streaks on my dining table.  But it’s always worth it.

When I get a specific craving in Boston, I look up menus online, from Asian restaurants around me. Somehow, I’m almost always let down. A lot of them tout “Singapore noodles” as an option, and it makes me huff every time. Do they mean Char Kway Teow, a flat rice noodle stir-fried with sambal and dark sweet soy sauce, or maybe Hokkien mee, a mix of yellow noodles, prawns and a distinct lime taste? Is it a Malay, Indian, or Chinese noodle dish? It’s so vague and disappointing, and I always give it a miss.

I spend too much money buying new bottles of chili sauce, ginger paste, and an assortment of other condiments and spices, hoping to one day build up a collection of tried and true ingredients to recreate my favorite dishes from home. Whenever I come back to visit, I leave room in my suitcase to accommodate as many sealed food products I can possibly lug back with me. I’m slowly growing my repertoire of dishes, but nothing I make will ever rival what I can get when I’m home.

Each time, however, that I share a dish I cooked with my roommates or my boyfriend, I remember the way my mother looks expectantly at my father and I as we dig into the dinner that she whipped up. “Try this,” I say, when someone peers into my pot on the stove. I feel so proud when my culinary results meet my taste buds’ expectations. Maybe a shared apartment can become a home only when its inhabitants eat together. I’m finding that food truly does bring people together, and I’m happy to cook a few extra servings.

Taina

Hi there! My name is Taina and I live in Boston, Massachusetts.  I grew up in Singapore, which is a long way from where I am now.  I went to college for writing, and I treasure the opportunity to tell my experiences through the written word.  I love eating food from different cultures and going to live music concerts.  Having grown up in a compact, dense city, I’ve always taken public transportation but I’ve begun driving for my work commute.   I hope this will give me more reason to drive and explore the United States, and share more of my adventures with you. 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

TCG food

Discovering Stories Behind New Dishes

A delicious meal with good company is one of my favourite moments in life. Growing up in South East Asia, I was fortunate to have been introduced to a wide variety of cuisines, notably Chinese, Malay, Indian, and Western. Later, as I explore the larger world around me, discovering new cuisines have become part of…
violins

Super DEI Heroes

Thanks to live-streaming, I had the opportunity to watch Joe Hisaishi’s (久石譲) World Dream concert in Tokyo. Hisaishi is a Japanese composer and musical director known for his works with his friend, Hayao Miyazaki’s (宮崎駿) on Studio Ghibli’s animated films (e.g., Spirited Away, My Neighbour Totoro, etc.) To many, Hisaishi is a modern-day legend.
Map - Greenland and Africa

Pondering on Our Own Truths

Since young, I was always drawn to ancient maps. When I was living in London during my undergraduate days, I enjoyed looking for old maps in the antique shops along King’s Road. Today, I have two world maps on my walls reminding me of my dream to travel the world. Now, what if I were…
Kendo

What We Can Learn from Kendo – “The Way of the Sword”

Few knew I’d practiced Kendo (劍道) during a period of my life. It all started with a Manga (Japanese comics) I read when I was little during a school holiday. I was intrigued by the self-discipline of this martial art and the tenacity of the main character. Years later, when I was working and living…
TCG Newsletter May 2021 - hand heart

Celebrating the World Day for Diversity this May

Last month, we talked about Diversity and Inclusion (D&I) and the people we surround ourselves with within our spheres. This month, in celebrating the World Day for Diversity, I would like to share this clip (~ 2mins) from the United Nations.
globe-diverse flags

Enriching Our World through Diversity and Inclusion

Today, Diversity and Inclusion (D&I) have become the buzz words. On their own, words are just an assembly of different alphabets/characters, insignificant and meaningless unless they lead to awareness and actions. Applying the famous idea: “we are the average of the five people we spend the most time with,” let’s expand it and explore our “world.” Here…
TCG - child airplane pretend

Advancing Humanity through Exploration

Inspired by J.C. Maxwell (1831-1879), who published the Theory of Electromagnetism, my final year undergraduate project at KCL was to design and fabricate a Microstrip Antenna for satellite communication. Today I still remain on the mailing list of a group of British IEE engineers living in France. Because of that, I got to watch NASA’s live broadcast…